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  #1  
Old 30th July 2006, 22:55
Crazy Diamond Crazy Diamond is offline
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Default Asperger's Syndrome

Hello....This is my first thread here I think it's in the right place.

I was wondering if anyone else here has this ? I think a lot of people with SA will display symptoms of it but I was wondering if anyone has actually been diagnosed with this. I've never met anyone that actually has. It's only been within the last couple of years, since I've been seeing a doctor, that I have been told that I have a mild form of this. Basically I find it hard to communicate, socialise and therefore make friends. I know this sounds just like SA but this is the kind that can't exactly be "cured" as you know. As it's mild it has never been something that's really noticable by other people...well...you could probably deduce that I find it hard to communicate but it's not so obvious that you can call it Asperger's.

Since discovering that I have it it's put a lot of things into perspective. Just, for example, memories that I have of being at primary school and to some extent not socialising propery or making friends as easily as other people. And sometimes my behaviour in general in and out of school. It seemed to give an exapanation to all of that. It's not all negative. It's quite funny that there is a sort of "incentive" to having this disorder. Well, at least, people with it should or ought see it as an incentive : Often someone with this would have a particular interest in one thing meaning they would have a lot of knowledge and be highly skilled in what area it is.....it could be from playing music, having a vast knowledge of Eastenders to having an obbsession with door handles ! I've found myself having had a passion for music - listening and particularly composing. I know that's something positive I can take from this.

Anyway, I'm sort of interested in talking to people with it. I don't know of any groups at all. Things like that would be an advantage. It's only recently has this really been getting me down. I find it easier to talk over the internet rather than face-to-face. I have an OT that I see regularly but honestly, no matter how experienced and good they are or even nice they are, they just understand how I feel and that's what I want really - someone to understand my frustrations. I don't think anyone can actually help me as such...they can only support me. Only I can help myself. No doctor will come up with a solution for me. But my lack of motivation for the last few years hasn't helped me at all. I've also never told anyone about about having Asperger's. It's never a great topic of conversation. And I don't want to come across as too "negative" to any of the friends that I have just now. But I do see the advantage of letting not be like so many other people. I'm just worried about this "stigma" thing really. I have no idea how some of my friends would therefore treat me if I told them I have this. Sometimes I really feel like doing it because it gets on my nerves that particularly one of friends seems to think I have been this "lazy" person for years since I haven't had a job for years until now. But he is a good guy and perhaps would understand if I said anything. I also don't want to make a big fuss over it and keep on thinking about it ! :P

So, anyway, I think I've moaned too much...so I better go now. But I think I feel a little bit better having posted this.
  #2  
Old 31st July 2006, 23:40
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy Diamond
Hello....This is my first thread here I think it's in the right place.

I was wondering if anyone else here has this ? I think a lot of people with SA will display symptoms of it but I was wondering if anyone has actually been diagnosed with this. I've never met anyone that actually has. It's only been within the last couple of years, since I've been seeing a doctor, that I have been told that I have a mild form of this. Basically I find it hard to communicate, socialise and therefore make friends. I know this sounds just like SA but this is the kind that can't exactly be "cured" as you know. As it's mild it has never been something that's really noticable by other people...well...you could probably deduce that I find it hard to communicate but it's not so obvious that you can call it Asperger's.

Since discovering that I have it it's put a lot of things into perspective. Just, for example, memories that I have of being at primary school and to some extent not socialising propery or making friends as easily as other people. And sometimes my behaviour in general in and out of school. It seemed to give an exapanation to all of that. It's not all negative. It's quite funny that there is a sort of "incentive" to having this disorder. Well, at least, people with it should or ought see it as an incentive : Often someone with this would have a particular interest in one thing meaning they would have a lot of knowledge and be highly skilled in what area it is.....it could be from playing music, having a vast knowledge of Eastenders to having an obbsession with door handles ! I've found myself having had a passion for music - listening and particularly composing. I know that's something positive I can take from this.

Anyway, I'm sort of interested in talking to people with it. I don't know of any groups at all. Things like that would be an advantage. It's only recently has this really been getting me down. I find it easier to talk over the internet rather than face-to-face. I have an OT that I see regularly but honestly, no matter how experienced and good they are or even nice they are, they just understand how I feel and that's what I want really - someone to understand my frustrations. I don't think anyone can actually help me as such...they can only support me. Only I can help myself. No doctor will come up with a solution for me. But my lack of motivation for the last few years hasn't helped me at all. I've also never told anyone about about having Asperger's. It's never a great topic of conversation. And I don't want to come across as too "negative" to any of the friends that I have just now. But I do see the advantage of letting not be like so many other people. I'm just worried about this "stigma" thing really. I have no idea how some of my friends would therefore treat me if I told them I have this. Sometimes I really feel like doing it because it gets on my nerves that particularly one of friends seems to think I have been this "lazy" person for years since I haven't had a job for years until now. But he is a good guy and perhaps would understand if I said anything. I also don't want to make a big fuss over it and keep on thinking about it ! :P

So, anyway, I think I've moaned too much...so I better go now. But I think I feel a little bit better having posted this.
I was statemented with Mild Asperger's at 14 and i am now 20 so that is what say nearly 7 years and now i am not 100% convinced. I do not have a lack of understanding of the situation i just feel anxious and anxiety and depression which goes from high to low which i have said many times before on this forum. So what if i do have it and i was wrong yes i couid have AS and SA infact you can have any number of disorders combined. I mayself have a huge passion for music, I have also started playing guitar but i am pretty bad at the moment ha ha

On the lazy thing i do get that but that is due to a lack of understanding of me rather then me.
  #3  
Old 2nd August 2006, 08:26
Goldie Goldie is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

I was convinced my partner has Asperger's before I found this site. I work with SEN teenagers so I know lots of kids who have been diagnosed with AS. It's a very fine line and often, as said before, it's a combination of several 'syndromes/disorders'. I'm sure you know all about AS but just for info:

Asperger's Syndrome has variety of characteristics and the disorder can range from mild to severe. Persons with AS show marked deficiencies in social skills, have difficulties with transitions or changes and prefer sameness. They often have obsessive routines and may be preoccupied with a particular subject of interest. They have a great deal of difficulty reading nonverbal cues (body language) and very often the individual with AS has difficulty determining proper body space. Often overly sensitive to sounds, tastes, smells, and sights, the person with AS may prefer soft clothing, certain foods, and be bothered by sounds or lights no one else seems to hear or see. It's important to remember that the person with AS perceives the world very differently.
AS have a normal IQ and many individuals (although not all), exhibit exceptional skill or talent in a specific area. Because of their high degree of functionality and their naiveté, those with AS are often viewed as eccentric or odd and can easily become victims of teasing and bullying. People with AS can be extremely literal and have difficulty using language in a social context.
This is sometimes referred to as high functioning autism or mild autism. Their average or above average intelligence can lead to feats of memory and mathematical excellence but they are not able to co-operate or interact with others at a social level.

Hard to tell where AS and SA are separated isn't it?
  #4  
Old 2nd August 2006, 10:07
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldie
I was convinced my partner has Asperger's before I found this site. I work with SEN teenagers so I know lots of kids who have been diagnosed with AS. It's a very fine line and often, as said before, it's a combination of several 'syndromes/disorders'. I'm sure you know all about AS but just for info:

Asperger's Syndrome has variety of characteristics and the disorder can range from mild to severe. Persons with AS show marked deficiencies in social skills, have difficulties with transitions or changes and prefer sameness. They often have obsessive routines and may be preoccupied with a particular subject of interest. They have a great deal of difficulty reading nonverbal cues (body language) and very often the individual with AS has difficulty determining proper body space. Often overly sensitive to sounds, tastes, smells, and sights, the person with AS may prefer soft clothing, certain foods, and be bothered by sounds or lights no one else seems to hear or see. It's important to remember that the person with AS perceives the world very differently.
AS have a normal IQ and many individuals (although not all), exhibit exceptional skill or talent in a specific area. Because of their high degree of functionality and their naiveté, those with AS are often viewed as eccentric or odd and can easily become victims of teasing and bullying. People with AS can be extremely literal and have difficulty using language in a social context.
This is sometimes referred to as high functioning autism or mild autism. Their average or above average intelligence can lead to feats of memory and mathematical excellence but they are not able to co-operate or interact with others at a social level.

Hard to tell where AS and SA are separated isn't it?
See reading that and other things again did not describe me then or now at all yet i was statemented at 14 with it.Even with high func mild AS people taiking and reading groups. They tend to have at least one disfunction like sensitive to sound or line up things or finding pattens in things etc.Now i am not saying my statement was wrong just that what if? I know it shouidn't matter but things like that do leave you wondering what if it is a mistake.
  #5  
Old 2nd August 2006, 15:30
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

I also get depression sometimes for no reason at all i couid be taiking quite happy and haif way through change anyone else relate to this?
  #6  
Old 5th August 2006, 13:17
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

I did this http://www.rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.php

Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 62 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 125 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

What does neurotypical mean?

and http://www.msnbc.com/modules/newswee...nt/default.asp

Score 16
  #7  
Old 5th August 2006, 15:40
Intro Guy
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Version 6 Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 127 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 72 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie


  #8  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:03
Medea Medea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Version 6
Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 49 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 109 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

So not Aspie.

ren
  #9  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:10
incommunicado incommunicado is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 103 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 107 of 200
You are more neurotypical than Aspie
  #10  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:16
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Sorry to sound dumb but can anyone tell me what neurotypical actually means?
  #11  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:17
incommunicado incommunicado is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

^ polite way of saying "Normal"
  #12  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:18
serialthrilla serialthrilla is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 145 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 55 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie
  #13  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:19
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by incommunicado
^ polite way of saying "Normal"
More evidence to add to the fire that my statement at 14 was likely bs.
  #14  
Old 5th August 2006, 16:46
tghe-retford tghe-retford is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 135 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 45 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

I did suspect that I may be an aspie, I even raised it with my doctor (who didn't confirm Aspergers but did confirm Social Anxiety). Someone who has been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome on another forum read a post I made there and sent me a PM saying that I sounded very much like him and that he suspected that I may have it too. Wouldn't surprise me if I did have Aspergers Syndrome to be honest.

I did have a headteacher at infants school who suspected that I had autism at a young age (about 5-6) but my Mum went mad and stormed off, taking me along with her shouting that my headteacher was wrong and that I was normal.

As for the other link Lunarsea gave:

My Autism Quotient score is 44, as a comparison that is very high, people who suffer with Aspergers Syndrome or high functioning autism generally score around 35. The average for most people is 15 for women and 17 for men.

My suspicision that I may have Aspergers Syndrome may be something I raise with the cognitive behavioural therapist I am seeing on Wednesday.
  #15  
Old 5th August 2006, 17:45
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Having read through THIS I'm convinced that I'm not an Aspie., even though I got a high score on the test.
  #16  
Old 5th August 2006, 17:55
Lunarsea Lunarsea is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intro Guy
Having read through THIS I'm convinced that I'm not an Aspie., even though I got a high score on the test.
I'm Convinced that I'm not an Aspie even though i was statemented at 14 and reading that as well makes me think so even more.
  #17  
Old 5th August 2006, 18:39
paulthequiet paulthequiet is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Your Aspie score: 94 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 79 of 200
You are more Aspie than neurotypical

Hmm I'm not sure and that article didnt make my mind up one way or the other.
  #18  
Old 22nd May 2007, 01:34
Johnni Johnni is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Your Aspie score: 110 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 92 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits
  #19  
Old 22nd May 2007, 09:30
tghe-retford tghe-retford is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by tghe-retford
Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 135 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 45 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie
I took the test again

Your Aspie score: 147 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 45 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Is it me, or has things got a little worse since I took the last test?
  #20  
Old 22nd May 2007, 09:31
Rick Sanchez Rick Sanchez is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Your Aspie score: 96 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 103 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

I think the social part ****ed me big time. That, and I have mostly all what is considered to be Attention Deficit Disorder traits.

Strangely enough, two of my previous friends have been diagnosed with Aspergers, and I can distinctively tell they are, through their general 'weird' behaviour and way of socialising. It's not 'shy' a such, but they seem ignorant and unaware of how to act and interpret anything social. That, and they seem very pedantic and obsessed over certain words or things. Well, that's what I've witnessed anyway.

Good quiz though.
  #21  
Old 22nd May 2007, 10:32
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

I have always thought of autism/aspergers as being the very opposite of SA. I lived next door to an autistic man and he certainly was not shy, quite the opposite in fact. He couldn't tell when he was boring and irritating people, had very little empathy or compassion and seemed not to need company. He also had no sense of humour, though he thought he had. His son had quite extreme aspergers and was pretty much living in his own world from childhood. He never made any effort with people or seemed to want to be near them, he was very aggressive and rude and just generally vile. But neither of them seemed aware of the impression they made on others or even of other people's existence and feelings. Their sense of humour seemed to consist of laughing at others misfortune. SA sufferers care TOO much what others think and feel and are often more empathetic than the average person. I can communicate very well, but inside I am in a state of anxious fear about how I am coming across. Oh, and they are both extremely arrogant, assuming they know everything and that others who do not share their interests are idiots. By contrast SA people tend to want to please others and make an excess of effort not to bore or irritate. They also tend to have low self esteem, which asperger sufferers rarely do. In fact the son recently appeared on a TV quiz he is obsessed with...can you imagine someone with SA doing that?

I would list the main characteristics of the three autistic people I have known as:

1. total lack of compassion or empathy (this was the most noticeable and striking of all the traits)

2. no sense of humour, unless laughing AT someone.

3. egotism, in that they assumed others shared their interests and were idiots if they did not.

4. good at things like maths, poor at anything requiring emotion, imagination and feeling, like literature.

5. very little interest in other people and a deep desire to be alone. Though they were not shy at all, they just lacked the normal need for human contact, for warmth and closeness. If they were in a busy dining hall they'd sit and eat quite happily, unaware of the noise and chatter and completely uninterested. The SA sufferer may not join in much, but they'd want to and would also be acutely self conscious and aware of the faces and voices around them, to the point that they couldn't eat.
  #22  
Old 22nd May 2007, 10:42
hardy hardy is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Many autistics and aspergers sufferes are well aware theyre "different" . Its certainly not true that they are nessarily arrogant or un anxious. this awareness can often lead to SA.

However that does not mean that most SAers have autistic tendencies . Most do not.
  #23  
Old 22nd May 2007, 10:58
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardy
Many autistics and aspergers sufferes are well aware theyre "different" . Its certainly not true that they are nessarily arrogant or un anxious. this awareness can often lead to SA.

However that does not mean that most SAers have autistic tendencies . Most do not.
It could just be the individual personalities of the autistic people i have known of course, but I lived next door to two of them and my mother used to work with some asperger kids and every one of them was arrogant, aggressive, very rude and not in the least bit shy. They seem the complete oppostie to the SA people i have known, even at the other end of the scale, with the majority of the population between us.
  #24  
Old 22nd May 2007, 11:00
Rick Sanchez Rick Sanchez is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moksha
I have always thought of autism/aspergers as being the very opposite of SA. I lived next door to an autistic man and he certainly was not shy, quite the opposite in fact. He couldn't tell when he was boring and irritating people, had very little empathy or compassion and seemed not to need company. He also had no sense of humour, though he thought he had. His son had quite extreme aspergers and was pretty much living in his own world from childhood. He never made any effort with people or seemed to want to be near them, he was very aggressive and rude and just generally vile. But neither of them seemed aware of the impression they made on others or even of other people's existence and feelings. Their sense of humour seemed to consist of laughing at others misfortune. SA sufferers care TOO much what others think and feel and are often more empathetic than the average person. I can communicate very well, but inside I am in a state of anxious fear about how I am coming across. Oh, and they are both extremely arrogant, assuming they know everything and that others who do not share their interests are idiots. By contrast SA people tend to want to please others and make an excess of effort not to bore or irritate. They also tend to have low self esteem, which asperger sufferers rarely do. In fact the son recently appeared on a TV quiz he is obsessed with...can you imagine someone with SA doing that?

I would list the main characteristics of the three autistic people I have known as:

1. total lack of compassion or empathy (this was the most noticeable and striking of all the traits)

2. no sense of humour, unless laughing AT someone.

3. egotism, in that they assumed others shared their interests and were idiots if they did not.

4. good at things like maths, poor at anything requiring emotion, imagination and feeling, like literature.

5. very little interest in other people and a deep desire to be alone. Though they were not shy at all, they just lacked the normal need for human contact, for warmth and closeness. If they were in a busy dining hall they'd sit and eat quite happily, unaware of the noise and chatter and completely uninterested. The SA sufferer may not join in much, but they'd want to and would also be acutely self conscious and aware of the faces and voices around them, to the point that they couldn't eat.
I also had a friend with Autism back in my primary school days (wow, the only friends I could make were people with disorders of some sort...) but he wasn't quite like you described. He did have empathy, and he often said he 'felt sorry' for certain people. He was as bad at me at Maths, he was fairly quiet most of the time, though he would get very hyperactive and act the 'class clown' at times. We were both young, so I can't say much about a 'sense of humor'. And he certainly didn't come across as arrogant or anything.

Funnily enough, I recently saw him (about a month ago) after like seven years of not having any contact. He didn't have the twitch he had anymore, and he seemed quite normal and well-rounded. Perhaps he was just a one-off for someone with Autism.
  #25  
Old 22nd May 2007, 11:51
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfather
I also had a friend with Autism back in my primary school days (wow, the only friends I could make were people with disorders of some sort...) but he wasn't quite like you described. He did have empathy, and he often said he 'felt sorry' for certain people. He was as bad at me at Maths, he was fairly quiet most of the time, though he would get very hyperactive and act the 'class clown' at times. We were both young, so I can't say much about a 'sense of humor'. And he certainly didn't come across as arrogant or anything.

Funnily enough, I recently saw him (about a month ago) after like seven years of not having any contact. He didn't have the twitch he had anymore, and he seemed quite normal and well-rounded. Perhaps he was just a one-off for someone with Autism.
That's interesting. I guess with any disorder your own personality still comes through. The people on this site all seem to vary greatly too.
  #26  
Old 22nd May 2007, 12:08
Rick Sanchez Rick Sanchez is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Well, our brains are confusing things. I guess it varies from person to person, though they will all show a certain amount of mainstream traits of Autism.
  #27  
Old 22nd May 2007, 12:40
hardy hardy is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

I scored 160! on the aspie test.

I think this topic has come up before and we came to the conclusion that many of the outward signs look very similar between SA and aspie/high function autism which can be very misleading .
for example an autistic may not function well in a given social situation because he cannot understand social cues wheras an SAER may act exactly the same way because he is afraid to act on those cues (for fear of negative reaction)

so I think an Aspie test is totally inaccurate if its an SA person taking it.
  #28  
Old 22nd May 2007, 12:42
Rick Sanchez Rick Sanchez is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardy
I scored 160! on the aspie test.

I think this topic has come up before and we came to the conclusion that many of the outward signs look very similar between SA and aspie/high function autism which can be very misleading .
for example an autistic may not function well in a given social situation because he cannot understand social cues wheras an SAER may act exactly the same way because he is afraid to act on those cues (for fear of negative reaction)

so I think an Aspie test will not work if its an SA person taking it.
Yeah, exactly.
  #29  
Old 22nd May 2007, 14:25
ajc ajc is offline
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardy

so I think an Aspie test is totally inaccurate if its an SA person taking it.
I'd have to agree. The nature of SA means that on a self assessment test you will very likely underestimate your communication skills, and any avoidance of social situations due to anxiety will probably also show up as being an aspergers trait rather than an anxiety trait.

I'm a little sceptical about most diagnoses of aspergers, but I'm not an expert and may well be wrong, so I won't say anything further.
  #30  
Old 22nd May 2007, 14:26
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Default Re: Asperger's Syndrome

Your Aspie score: 104 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 100 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits
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